Posts Tagged ‘kindergarten’

Enjoy Some Picture book Fun with Creepy Carrots

Posted on January 10th, 2015 by Carolyn Hart

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Enjoy Some Picture book Fun with Creepy CarrotsCreepy Carrots written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown
Outstanding picture book published by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers





Terrific fun for children aged five years and up, Jasper Rabbit is very fond of carrots and makes a trip to Crackenhopper Field whenever he fancies eating a few delicious treats but one day Jasper has an eerie feeling that Creepy Carrots are following him as he leaves the field. Soon Jasper is seeing Creepy Carrots everywhere: in his house, in the garden shed and on the street. Poor Jasper is petrified! He knows exactly what to do to solve this problem.

Preschool and kindergarten teachers will find all sorts of wonderful (and orange) ways to extend the learning with this delightful book. Whether designing their own carrots or a different solution to Jasper’s problem, this book is sure to inspire fun. Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! would be an excellent companion story.

2013 Randolph Caldecott Medal Honor Book
ALA Notable Book of 2013
2013 Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators Crystal Kite Award Winner (Midwest)

Coloring pages (free PDF download) from Peter Brown’s webpage

Flannel Friday: Flannelboard and Template

Creepy Carrots! at Amazon.com

Creepy Carrots! at Amazon.ca

The Creepy Carrots Zone from Peter Brown on Vimeo.


Billy Bully Learns Consequences of Bullying

Posted on November 17th, 2012 by Carolyn Hart

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Billy Bully A school-yard counting tale – written by Alvaro and Ana Galan, illustrated by Steve Simpson
Counting book about bullying and friendship published by Scholastic

Be sure to check out our page about anti-bullying picture books for children, our page about anti bullying chapter books, graphic novels and novels for children , and our Pinterest anti bullying board

When Billy Bully arrives at the school playground, his animal friends are already there. Cow is enjoying a swing, horse is on the teeter totter and duck is on the slide. Within moments, Billy Bully has taken charge. He chases the others off the slide, grabs toys and he won’t wait his turn. One by one, he upsets each of his classmates and loses friends.

Eventually Billy Bully discovers that every one of his classmates has run away from him. There is no one to play with.

Now Billy Bully’s feeling blue,
Until – he figures out just what to do.

He says to Sheep, “It’s you who won.”
And now his friends are up to 1!

After counting down his friends, Billy sets to work repairing the harm he has done.

When Billy Bull learns how to play,
all his friends come back to stay.

Best suited to preschool or kindergarten age children, Billy Bully is a rhyming counting book with an important message about bullying and friendship. It includes an Afterword for parents and teachers by Ellen Jacobs, Ph.D., Clinical Social Work

Billy Bully at Amazon.com

Billy Bully at Amazon.ca


We Share Everything – Celebrate Pink Shirt Day in Kindergarten

Posted on February 25th, 2011 by Carolyn Hart

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We Share Everything! written by Robert Munsch and illustrated by Michael Martchenko
Picture book about kindergarten and sharing published by Scholastic

Be sure to check out our page about anti-bullying picture books for children, our page about anti bullying chapter books, graphic novels and novels for children , and our Pinterest anti bullying board

While not strickly speaking an “anti-bullying” resource, We Share Everything! is a story about getting along – with a pink twist. A perfect book to use in a kindergarten class to celebrate Pink Shirt Day.

Amanda and Jeremiah’s first day of kindergarten is filled with clashes. When Amanda selects a story from the bookshelf, Jeremiah demands that she give it to him. Their noisy conflict draws the attention of an enthusiastic kindergarten teacher who gushes, “This is kindergarten. In kindergarten we share. We share everything.” As the day progresses, the kindergarten teacher shares these same pearls of wisdom through conflicts with building blocks and paint spatters. She remains unflappable until the youngsters take heed of her advice and decide to share their clothes. “The teacher came back and said, “Oh Jeremiah and Amanda. You’re sharing, and you’re learnning how to act in kindergarten, and you’re being very grown-up, and Jeremiah, I really like your… PINK PANTS! Jeremiah, where did you get those pink pants?” A fun look at sharing and getting along, best for children aged four to six.

Listen to Robert Munsch share the story with an audience

We Share Everything! at Amazon.com

We Share Everything! at Amazon.ca


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