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Your search topic comprehension returned the following articles:

Reading Comprehension – 8 Ways to Reinforce Your Child’s Understanding

Monday, October 31st, 2011

Try some of these strategies to help your child with reading comprehension Here are eight ways to reinforce a young child’s reading comprehension… You will also want to read our page about reading comprehension. Please click on the book covers for information about each picture book. Before opening the cover of a book, take a […]

Reading and Interpreting Pictures Supports Reading Comprehension

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

Two of the components of a child’s reading readiness are her comprehension and her interpretation. We can assist a preschool or kindergarten child with reading readiness by providing opportunities for him to read pictures and interpret them, including understanding the sequence of events. Reading and interpreting pictures includes noticing what is in the picture, what […]

5 Reading Comprehension Tips for Parents and Homeschoolers

Friday, April 8th, 2011

Reading comprehension – ensuring that readers understand We help our children to learn letters and then letter sounds. We sit with them while they read their first words and we share their excitement as they become readers. As this amazing transformation takes place, we should remember the goal of reading: comprehension. It is not enough […]

Reading Comprehension Activities, Games, Books and Printables

Sunday, October 31st, 2010

Comprehension is the most important skill in reading There are a variety of ways to support the development of comprehension skills. Some of these can begin long before a child reads independently. Make Connections We should encourage all preschool and older children to make connections between books and their own real-life experiences (a new baby […]

Make Your Child’s Read Aloud Experience Magical- Like a Trip to a Theme Park

Monday, January 8th, 2018

Use our 7 tips to make your child’s read aloud experience enjoyable and magical for both of you!

  • Disneyland refers to itself as, “The Happiest Place on Earth!” We think that your daily read aloud experience should be the happiest part of your day. This is an opportunity to forget about work, forget about chores, forget about whatever is distracting you and make storytime an opportunity to focus just on your child. Read aloud is a time to escape into great picture books or chapter books and create wonderful memories and learning opportunities for your child.
  • Just as you might count down the days ’til you visit a theme park, create some excitement about the read aloud experience. “What shall we read tonight?” “I can’t wait for our storytime!”, “Let’s borrow a HUGE pile of books from the library this weekend!”, What kind of book would you like for your birthday?, Which books shall we take on our holiday?
  • Just as it is fun to go on the same ride more than once, it also completely fine to read the same book more than once! Each time you read aloud, children are learning new vocabulary, they are gaining phonemic awareness and exploring new ideas and new themes. Don’t worry if they want to hear the same book over and over again. They are still benefiting from the experience and enjoying the time with you!
  • The best theme park rides immerse the riders in the experience! We want to do the same when we read aloud. Use silly, giggling voices, stern, authoritative voices. Use high-pitched squeaky voices and low-pitched growls. Act out part of the story along with your child! Build a special fort and read inside it! Turn out the lights and read with a flashlight or read while streched out on a picnic blanket.
  • Books for Bedtime! Special Stories to Share with Children

    Saturday, May 20th, 2017

    A picture book about going to bed, 10 Minutes to Bedtime written and illustrated by Peggy Rathmann10 Minutes till Bedtime written and illustrated by Peggy Rathmann
    Mostly wordless picture book published by G.P. Putnam’s Sons Books for Young Readers an imprint of Penguin

    In this classic, fun picture book, Dad cautions his son that it is 10 minutes till bedtime. Within a moment, a pet hamster has summoned other neighborhood hamsters to stop by for ten minutes of fun. Preschool-aged (and older) children will enjoy the detailed and engaging illustrations that tell most of the story. Of course, the joke is on Dad as he has no idea what is happening behind his back, as his son gets ready for bed. Good fun and a great opportunity for language and comprehension development. Carefully ‘reading’ the illustrations and talking about what is happening is a big part of this bedtime story.

    10 Minutes till Bedtime at Amazon.com

    10 Minutes till Bedtime at Amazon.ca

    Storytime Standouts shares picture books about going to bed including Baby Bedtime Baby Bedtime written by Mem Fox and illustrated by Emma Quay
    Rhyming toddler picture book about bedtime published by Simon and Schuster

    Soft tones and sparse, rhyming text are hallmarks of this gentle picture book about a baby elephant’s bedtime. Cuddling and smiling, an adult elephant takes a baby elephant through a bedtime routine (including a story!) before finally saying goodnight.

    One of the really lovely aspects of this picture book is that the gender and age of the adult elephant is not specific. This could be a mom, dad, grandparent, aunt or uncle putting the youngster to bed.

    Baby Bedtime at Amazon.com

    Baby Bedtime at Amazon.ca

    Rhyming picture book about bedtime Steam Train, Dream TrainSteam Train, Dream Train written by Sherri Duskey Rinker and illustrated by Tom Lichtenheld
    Rhyming picture book about bedtime published by Chronicle Books

    Wonderful rich vocabulary and onomatopoeia make this a wonderful bedtime story for preschool-age and older children. Children who are interested in trains, will enjoy hearing the names of the various cars (hopper, tender, reefer, gondolas etc.) and will hear the rhythmic text that echos the sounds we associate with stream trains.

    Set in moonlight, Mr. Lichtenheld’s illustrations, created with wax oil pastel are beautifully atmospheric. We especially liked the train’s arrival and the child’s moonlit bedroom.

    Steam Train, Dream Train at Amazon.com

    Steam Train, Dream Train at Amazon.ca

    A picture book about bedtime How to Put Your Parents to BedHow to Put Your Parents to Bed written by Mylisa Larsen and illustrated by Babette Cole
    Fun picture book about Bedtime published by Katherine Tegen Books, an imprint of Harper Collins Publishers

    Preschool-age and older children will enjoy the humor as a young girls tries to get her parents to go to bed. Chores, a computer, games, television and even cell phones are delaying mom and dad’s bedtime but, with determination, it is possible for her to get them settled and off to sleep.

    Older children, especially those who resist shut-eye, will see themselves in this fun role-reversal tale.

    How to Put Your Parents to Bed at Amazon.com

    How to Put Your Parents to Bed at Amazon.ca

    Princess Baby Night-Night written and illustrated by Karen KatzPrincess Baby Night-Night written and illustrated by Karen Katz
    Picture book about getting ready for bed published by Schwartz and Wade, an imprint of Random House

    Getting ready for bed can be an exhausting proposition. Princess Baby has lots to do. She not only puts her own pajamas on, she dresses her six special friends for bed too. She also helps with washing up, brushing teeth and selecting stories.

    Bright, beautiful collage illustrations make this a great story to share in a group setting. Fans of Princess Baby will want to explore Princess Baby and Princess Baby on the Go.

    Princess Baby, Night-Night at Amazon.com

    Princess Baby, Night-Night at Amazon.ca

    Wordless Picture Book Fun with Flora the Flamingo

    Sunday, August 14th, 2016

    From my perspective, wordless picture books are an under-appreciated genre. “Readable” in any language (or multiple languages), they help children to develop comprehension skills and they can be used to prompt discussion and encourage language development.

    Last week, I had the pleasure to read two wordless picture books by Molly Idle. Floral and the Flamingo was published in 2013. Flora and the Peacocks was published this year. Flora and the Penguin was published in between.

    Floral and the Flamingo begins when a young girl approaches a statuesque flamingo and takes her cues from the bird. Soon it appears that the flamingo is challenging the girl to match her posture and form. Floral is up to the task. She stands on one leg, she arches her back, she stretches and poses. Before too long, the flamingo and Flora are dancing together and loving every moment of the experience.

    A truly lovely picture book that uses flaps beautifully, this will have special appeal for fans of ballet. Delightful illustrations are wonderfully expressive and will create an opportunity to talk about Flora’s emotions as she does her best to match the graceful flamingo’s movements.

    Flora the Flamingo was a 2014 Caldecott Honor Book

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    It’s Back to School! Time to Reestablish the Bedtime Reading Ritual

    Monday, September 1st, 2014

    Most teachers and parents are glued to the news and various forms of social media, hoping to hear the news that public schools will be back in session on Tuesday, or at the very least, next week. It’s been a longer summer than we’re used to and it started under less than ideal conditions. I don’t know one teacher who isn’t sad about the quick way we had to say goodbye to our classes in June. But alas, all this stuff makes us stronger, right? We’ll see.

    In a typical summer, your child’s reading level will probably lower. This summer, because of it’s length, this is even more likely. It happens: later bedtimes, fun activities, and vacations change the routine that many of us have established through the school year. When we get back to school, we spend those first weeks reestablishing routines, both at school and at home. I can’t honestly put into words how very much I want (NEED) school to go back next week, but while we’re waiting, we can slowly start pushing ourselves and our children back into those old habits.

    Getting to bed earlier, what used to be “on time”, is important. I’m not very good at this one, myself. I figure that the first week of having to get up at six thirty will curb my tendency to stay up until one a.m. For our kids though, it’s nice to ease them into it. This last week or so, we’ve been getting home earlier if we’re out, sending the kids to get ready closer to their usual time. The main reason for this is to reestablish the bedtime reading ritual.

    Throughout the school year, this is one we try to hold onto tightly. The fifteen to thirty minutes with each of the girls at the end of the night is just as important to my husband and I as it is to them. Somehow, being told that it’s time to go up and read causes less confrontation that it’s time to go up to bed. One of the best things you can do for your child, regardless of whether school goes back, is get this routine going again. Get them excited about books, about reading. Maybe pick out a special book at the library or bookstore to get you back into things.

    Students reading every night plays a huge role in their fluency and comprehension. Whether you’re reading to them or they are reading to you, this is a time that can result in great conversations with your kids. Why would the main character do that? Would YOU do that? What might you have done? My youngest likes to read to us but my oldest likes to be read to. Children (okay, people) are never too old to be read to. Just because your child is going into an upper grade, doesn’t mean that quality reading time has to stop. In fact, it might even be more important.

    When they’re little, children are your shadow. But when they get older, they start to turn into themselves more, or to friends. That reading time at the end of the day is your chance to connect. We know how busy the days are, with school, work, activities, more activities. Building that constant into your schedule, keeping it that way, will allow for a time when your child can open up to you, if they want. They’ll know that at the end of every day, you’re checking in with them. Maybe they don’t want to open up about what boy they like or the mean girl at school, but they’ll know that you’ll be there and they can listen to your voice or that you’ll listen to them. There’s comfort in that. Our children take comfort in routine and whether school is back or not, it’s time for us to get back to it. Good luck with the first day, whenever it is.

    Storytime Standouts – Presenting our Highlights

    Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

    Welcome to Storytime Standouts Storytime Standouts is for parents, teachers and other caregivers who are supporting young readers and are interested in discovering great children’s books. We write about ways to support children as they learn the alphabet, learn letter sounds, start to read and embrace reading. We are enthusiastic about great children’s books and […]

    10 Ways to help upper elementary students enjoy reading

    Saturday, May 25th, 2013

    My goal is for students to realize the amazing journeys they can have just from reading a book. We live in a digital age and yes, technology is essential and important. However, if we can get kids curled up with a good book, turning pages, reaching for the sequel, we are encouraging them to become stronger at a skill that is not only essential but can bring them endless enjoyment. Never underestimate the power of a great book.

    Freckle Juice – a fun chapter book for children aged 7 and up

    Monday, April 22nd, 2013

    Andrew thinks that if he had freckles his life would be a lot easier. A classmate offers him a solution to this problem for fifty cents. This evoked some conversation with my girls, as Andrew tells us that fifty cents is FIVE weeks of allowance. Little details like this made the girls connect to the story and talk about things like: Would you give up your allowance for someone to share a secret with you? Do you think the classmate really knows a secret? Why do you think fifty cents was a lot of money then but isn’t now? Pretty interesting and driven forward by the girls. I love book talk so I enjoyed listening to them and talking to them very much.

    Our guest contributor asks, Is there such a thing as too much reading?

    Monday, April 1st, 2013

    We all want to see our children reading. Even parents who don’t love to read, (such as my own dad who refuses to) like to see their children enjoying reading. We know that it’s part of what makes us successful in life. Reading and comprehension open not only figurative doors, but literal ones as well. […]

    Family Literacy Program Development Part 2

    Monday, October 8th, 2012

    Family Literacy Program format Each session of our family literacy program began with a thirty minute “storytime” presented by a librarian. The storytime theme matched the weekly program theme. This ensured a good match between the librarian’s “storytime” and the program presented by the program facilitator. Following the “storytime,” the group learned a new rhyme […]

    Wordless Books

    Thursday, June 7th, 2012

    Storytime Standouts looks at wordless picture books and why they belong on every child’s bookshelf Wordless and almost wordless picture books rely exclusively on illustrations to tell a story or convey facts. Some wordless and almost wordless picture books have a small amount of text but most do not have any text at all. Wordless […]

    Reading for Reward – Are Extrinsic Rewards Good or Bad?

    Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

    Whether it’s reading, math, science, or socials, there is conflict over rewarding children for meeting goals and expectations in the classroom. If we reward them with tangible “prizes”, do we diminish their intrinsic motivation? An argument can be made either way. We need, and kids need, to understand intrinsic motivation. Not every accomplishment deserves a […]

    Beyond Bedtime Stories, early literacy can Include more than reading

    Friday, October 21st, 2011

    Beyond Bedtime Stories by V. Susan Bennett-Armistead, Nell K. Duke and Annie M. Moses Beyond Bedtime Stories is a very thorough exploration of ways parents can promote early literacy with young children. The authors address dozens of important questions like “What if a book contains words or ideas that I find offensive?” and “Should I […]

    The Reading Zone by Nancie Atwell – Discover Ways to Help Teen Readers

    Tuesday, September 13th, 2011

    Do you share my concerns about inspiring preteen and teen readers? The Reading Zone written by Nancie Atwell Professional teaching/parenting resource about teen readers published by Scholastic Over the weekend, I had an opportunity to enjoy reading Nancie Atwell’s The Reading Zone: How to Help Kids Become Skilled, Passionate, Habitual, Critical Readers. I am always […]

    Bolstering Phonemic Awareness, Getting Ready to Read While in the Car

    Sunday, September 4th, 2011

    Some of the keys to learning to read are noticing sounds in words (developing phonemic awareness), recognizing letters of the alphabet and understanding words. Next time you’re in the car with your preschool or kindergarten child, spend a few minutes talking about sounds and words. Informal chats like these, can have a huge impact on […]

    This year we won’t sign up for the Summer Reading Club – but I still want the boys to read

    Sunday, June 26th, 2011

    We all agreed that this year we won’t sign up for the library’s Summer Reading Club but nonetheless I intend to take them to the library once a week during July and August. Friday, the first day of our summer holiday, we ventured into the main branch and the vast children’s section of our local library. My eldest boy was soon engrossed in a book about World War II. My youngest boy was equally engrossed – he was watching other kids play computer games online.

    Spring Theme Printables for Preschool and Kindergarten

    Sunday, April 3rd, 2011

    Easter and Spring theme free printables for children that you can download and use at home or in a classroom right away.





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